HORIZON COMMUNITIES IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION
   
 
Community
         
    THE HORIZON COMMUNITY

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At 4,000 feet in elevation, we enjoy a smog-free, high desert location above the escarpment of the Rio Grand valley. We are located in east El Paso County, where Texas, New Mexico and Mexico meet.

Horizon has easy access to Ciudad Juárez via the Paso del Norte International Bridge. Cd. Juárez is a thriving city of over one million people. It is a major manufacturing and industrial center with strong trade relations with El Paso and the rest of the United States.

Horizon is also within an hour’s drive of the state of New Mexico. The Land of Enchantment offers a host of cultural, historical, and outdoor activities. Some of New Mexico's best mountain resort areas – famous for snow skiing, boating and hiking – are just three hours away.

Boundaries
The Horizon area is generally bounded by the El Paso City limits to the west, Interstate-10 to the south, the Hueco Mountains to the east, and Montana Avenue and military land to the north.

The developed urban area centers on the Town of Horizon City. The incorporated township has an area of more than five-and-a-half square miles. It is located about three miles east of the El Paso city limits and about two miles northeast of I-10.

Getting Here
Traveling from El Paso on I-10, take the Eastlake exit and follow the road for three miles. You can also take the Horizon exit. Horizon Boulevard continues past the main urban area all the way to Lake El Paso and the foothills of the Hueco Mountains. Access to the area is also available from Montana Avenue along Ascension Drive. Ascension is a local north-south route, which connects to Horizon Boulevard.

If you are coming from the El Paso airport, we are 25 minutes away, via I-10.
Horizon consists of many communities.
The existing settled areas began as separate villages, which have proceeded to grow and become increasingly interdependent. Around these there are several large, mostly undeveloped subdivisions, extending all the way to the Hueco Mountains. Each community and subdivision has its own character and circumstances.

The Town of Horizon City was incorporated in 1988.
An estimated 7,000 people now live in Horizon. Horizon Heights and Horizon Manor are the two original subdivisions of the town. Horizon Heights was built around the Emerald Springs Golf Club and features custom-built houses within walking distance of the golf course and clubhouse. Horizon Manor is the adjacent residential subdivision to the southeast. Other subdivisions within the town include the Eastlake, Horizon Mesa, Paseo Del Este, and Emerald Estates.

Development generally is spreading along Eastlake Drive.
Most notably it includes the new Paseo Del Este development to the north of the incorporated area. Other developing subdivisions outside the town include Horizon Hills to the west and Horizon View Estates to the south. There are several other communities within a five-mile radius of the core area. They are El Paso Hills, Agua Dulce, Lakeway, Colonia Revolucion and Sparks.



Most area businesses are on or near Horizon Boulevard.
Commercial floor space is presently undergoing a major expansion. Retail activity is becoming increasingly concentrated around the Eastlake Commercial Center, on the corner of Eastlake Drive and Horizon Boulevard. There is also an established industrial area on the western side of Horizon Manor.

Growth continues to transform our communities.

The 2000 U.S. Census confirmed that the Horizon area was one of the fastest growing urban centers in El Paso County in the 1990s. Since then, the growth rate has exceeded 10% annually and looks set to continue.

The 2004 Census estimated that 20,000 people make up our population. This includes incorporated and unincorporated areas. Experts expect this figure to reach 65,000 by the year 2020.



Horizon attracts young residents.

Early development around the golf course gave the area a retirement character. Young families now predominate, but the incorporated area still has a higher education and income profile than the rest of El Paso. The average family income in the Horizon core is equal to that of other Southwestern cities, including Tucson, Denver and Phoenix.

In 1999, Horizon Communities, in partnership with B&G Land Management, a local developer, commissioned a special community survey to supplement outdated 1990 census figures. The University of Texas at El Paso conducted the survey. Results showed that the central urban area has a higher-than-average income and a high rate of home ownership. The vast majority of respondents were married, and most were in their 20s and 30s.
The Town of Horizon City (915.852.1046) has responsibility for the day-to-day administration of its police, zoning, subdivision approval, building control and road maintenance. The township also controls subdivision within its one-mile Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) to the east. Horizon has plans to annex land to keep up with urban expansion, though these plans are complicated by an ETJ, which overlaps with that of the City of El Paso.

The City of El Paso (915.541.4000) controls all subdivisions within its five-mile eastern ETJ. This area extends all the way to the western boundaries of Horizon City.

El Paso County (915.546.2000) controls subdivisions in all remaining areas. Otherwise, its responsibilities apply to all unincorporated areas, including the ETJ’s of both El Paso and Horizon. There is no zoning, planning or building regulation in unincorporated county areas in Texas. The county also has some jurisdiction within incorporated areas.

City Administration
A council consisting of a mayor and seven aldermen Horizon governs Horizon. Currently, all positions have two-year terms and are at-large. Responsibilities include planning and zoning, street maintenance, public safety, parks, libraries, recreational facilities and other quality of life services. There are just over 100 city ordinances in place to facilitate these functions.

Four departments handle the day-to-day operations of the town. They are: administration, public works, public safety (police), and municipal court. The administration department includes the city clerk, city attorney, city treasurer and administrative receptionist. Public works has a director, administrative assistant, a part-time planner, and three maintenance workers. Public safety staff includes the chief of police, eight full-time officers, and five reserve officers. The municipal court has one judge and two court clerks.

Horizon Communities and the Town of Horizon City have joined resources on a number of projects designed to promote the development of the community and enhance quality of life. In 1996, Horizon City obtained supplementary funding for Horizon Communities’ construction of the second stage of Eastlake Drive. In 1997, the council was able to construct the Oz Glaze Senior Citizen Center. It used state grant funds secured by a Horizon Communities’ local match. Horizon Communities funded playground equipment and other improvements for the adjoining community park and dedicated land for the project.

Coordinating Group
In 2002, representatives of the various authorities in the area started meeting on a monthly basis to keep informed of local developments, and each other’s plans. The Horizon Coordinating Group (HCG), as it is called, was organized with the help of the Rio Grand Council of Governments. The meetings are open and local developers are encouraged to attend.

Emergency Services
The El Paso County Emergency Services District #1 provides the Horizon Communities area with fire and ambulance services. The Emergency Services District is a tax-supported public agency. It was originally established in 1975 as a rural fire prevention district. It has an annual operating budget of approximately $250,000, and operates four fire trucks and two special equipment vehicles. The district is also responsible for emergency ambulance service through a county-contracted, private ambulance company.

A minimum of 15 volunteers, of which several are certified as emergency medical technicians, emergency care attendants and firefighters are available to respond to Horizon City area emergencies.

Supervised by a three-member Board of Commissioners appointed by the El Paso County Commissioners Court, the District services the communities of Horizon City, Agua Dulce, Ascension, and Lakeway. It also assists other adjoining emergency districts when necessary to suppress fires outside of the District boundaries.
Due to an abundant aquifer, the Horizon area has one of the most reliable water supplies in the arid southwest. The Horizon Regional Municipal Utility District, rated a superior water system by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, operates a state-of-the-art reverse-osmosis water treatment plant. The facility converts the brackish groundwater into 8 million gallons of potable water per day. Given Horizon’s growth, HRMUD’s wastewater treatment plant is planned to expand by an additional 1.5 million gallons per day.

Horizon Regional Municipal Utility District
HRMUD (915.852.3917) was created by legislation in 1961 and converted to a municipal utility district in 1989. The district encompasses about 91,000 acres in east El Paso County and is governed by a five-member elected board.

The boundaries of the HRMUD include most of the wider Horizon area. HRMUD now has more than adequate water supply and treatment capacity for the next five years and can expand as needed. The HRMUD also provides sewerage and trash services.

Horizon‘s growth had HRMUD reporting an average an increase of about 300 water connections a year between 1995 and 2000. This increased to 400 new water connections in 2001, and a record 542 in 2003. By December 31, 2003, the district had 5,268 active water connections and 3,828 sewer connections. Sewerage upgrade projects planned for the next few years will see sewer figures catch up.

Maps of Water and Sewage Lines:    Map-1    Map-2

Other MUDs
The area between the Town of Horizon City and the eastern boundary of El Paso is served by smaller MUDs. These will be responsible for supplying the Paseo Del Este development as it extends west along Eastlake Drive. Because these MUDs will most likely obtain water from neighboring water utilities, an agreement has already been reached with the Public Service Board (El Paso’s water authority) to meet most of the foreseeable water and sewer needs of Paseo Del Este.

HCIA's Role
In its 30-year history, Horizon Communities Improvement Association has made major contributions to local water infrastructure. It funded pioneering investigations of the groundwater resource in the 1980s. All major works financed by the association are now owned and managed by HRMUD. Further funding and assistance is proposed to expand networks, which will serve more association members’ properties. Horizon Communities recently completed construction of a new sewer line to permit planned development along Eastlake Drive to connect with the new lift station one mile to the east. Similar extensions are proposed in 2004.

Other Utilities
El Paso Electric (915.543.5970) covers the whole of the county and has been implementing a major upgrade of its network in the Horizon area. Power is supplied by coal-generated stations in New Mexico and long-term availability has been assured by the procuring of a stake in Arizona's Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station. The company is also investing in alternative energy sources.

Southern Union Gas (915.544.6300) distributes natural gas. The City of El Paso regulates the company at the local level and the Texas Railroad Commission regulates it at the state level. The company uses a mix of interstate, intrastate and spot market gas. This affords customers some of the lowest available rates along with one of the more stable gas supplies in the nation.

Southwestern Bell (1.800.464.7928) oversees the local telephone network. The company has deployed advanced digital switches in all central offices and connected them with fiber optics. There are currently 13 central offices in the Horizon/El Paso area.
The Horizon area has some of the best schools in Texas. Horizon area families are served by two school districts which oversee a total of four elementary schools, three intermediate/middle schools, and two high schools.

Socorro Independent School District (SISD) – Schools serving the Horizon area:

  • Horizon Heights Elementary  (the first school in the Horizon area)
  • Desert Wind Elementary  (opened 2003, located in the El Paso Hills subdivision)
  • Colonel John O. Ensor Middle  (opened 2000, located adjacent to Horizon Heights)
  • Montwood High School  (located in east El Paso)
  • SISD Education Center (located in the Horizon area on Eastlake Drive at I-10)

Clint Independent School District (CISD) – Schools serving the Horizon area:

  • Desert Hills Elementary  (located in the Horizon area on North Kenazo Drive)
  • Frank Macias Elementary  (opened 2001, located in the Horizon Manor subdivision)
  • Carroll T. Welch Intermediate  (located just off Horizon Boulevard)
  • Horizon Middle  (opened 2006, located on North Kenazo Drive, adjoins with Desert Hills Elementary)
  • Horizon High School  (opened 2002, located off Horizon Boulevard)
Clint has acquired sites in the Horizon industrial area to centralize its warehousing and operational support facilities. In addition, Clint provided the land for a Head Start (pre-school) facility on land adjoining the Frank Macias Elementary School. CISD is Horizon’s largest employer.

Socorro Independent School District and Clint Independent School District serve Horizon. Both SISD and CISD have been recognized by the Texas Education Agency and continue to set new standards in excellence. Socorro ISD (915.937.0000) extends from East El Paso to the westernmost side of Town of Horizon City. Clint ISD (915.851.2877) covers the remainder of the Horizon area.

Maps of Boundries & Districts:    Map-1    Map-2

Background
Initially, both school districts served small farming and ranching communities in the Rio Grand Valley, but their northern boundaries were drawn all the way to the county line and the Texas/New Mexico border. SISD also serves the Socorro area, a rapidly expanding suburb of east El Paso, and the western half of the existing urban area of Horizon City. CISD also serves the original Clint area, the remainder of the Horizon area, and a community to our north known as East Montana.

Regional Post Scondary Education HCIA's Role
Horizon Communities has long been an active supporter of schools. Our main contributions has been in the form of land donations. For example, Horizon Communities provided CISD with an 18-acre site for its new administrative center, which opened September 2003. The opening brought the district’s historically fragmented administration together for the first time.
Recreation and Leisure
Emerald Springs Golf Course and Conference Center features 18-holes of golf on a beautifully maintained course of gently rolling hills. There are tennis courts and a swimming pool. The clubhouse offers elegant dining and dancing, as well as informal lunches during the day.

For families with children, Horizon offers a Little League field and a playground at Community Park. A second park with playground and exercise facilities is located in the new Horizon Mesa subdivision. More parks and improvements are planned in newer subdivisions. School sports facilities are also open to local residents for extracurricular events and activities.

Seniors have the Oz Glaze Senior Citizen Center, constructed by Horizon City on land donated by Horizon Communities. The center is a popular meeting place for all members of the community.

The surrounding high desert is a scenic and recreational resource. At 4,000 feet elevation, Horizon is situated in a vast expanse of natural splendor. It is used for hiking and biking as well as passive recreation. An evening stroll against the backdrop of a desert sunset is something to be savored.

Community
Our residents can take advantage of many opportunities to play an active roll in a variety of local service organizations. These include Kiwanis, Lions, and Optimist Clubs, the Horizon City Youth Association, the American Legion, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

For kids and teenagers, we have the Youth Association, the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts and Brownies. Seniors can take part in numerous activities at the Oz Glaze Senior Citizen Center.

Families have a choice of Catholic, Episcopal and Baptist churches. Our Community Chapel provides a non-denominational Protestant place to worship.

Child Care and Pre-School
Working parents now have a choice of two major child care facilities. Other daycare and home care options are available. The new Pete Duarte Head Start facility on Darrington Road provides pre-school education close to the Frank Macias Elementary School in Horizon Manor. This facility is operated by the Region 19 Education Service Center.

Contacts
As a free service to our community, we will provide contacts for your organization here:
Access from El Paso is now available from Eastlake Drive, directly off Interstate-10. The main road serving the Horizon area is Horizon Boulevard. Most local commercial development front this thoroughfare, which also connects to I-10. Horizon Boulevard runs east-west from the main urban area to the Hueco Mountains. Ascension is a north-south route connecting Horizon Boulevard with Montana Avenue to our north.



Improvements
Improvements to the regional road network will occur as the local population expands.

The Horizon area is also close to Loop Road 375, which will become increasingly important as an El Paso by-pass. There are presently direct links to Horizon from the loop road via I-10 and Eastlake-Rojas. A further link to the loop road is planned via an extension of the existing Pellicano Drive. The loop road is being continually upgraded. This includes a major upgrade of the existing Joe Battle/I-10 interchange. Several grade-separated intersections are also at an advanced stage of construction along Joe Battle. This will significantly reduce travel times on the loop road and make it more attractive as a major traffic route.

Some of the older roads in the local street network are also being upgraded with grant money from the State of Texas. Darrington Road, our original north-south spine road, is soon to become a four-lane divided road, all the way from Eastlake in the north to the southern boundary of the incorporated area. Improvements to Ashford Street are pending.

Eastlake Drive
Eastlake Drive is now one of the main roads serving the Horizon urban area. All of Eastlake Drive was built with Horizon Communities’ support. The first phase, built by a local developer, included Rojas from its intersection with Loop 375 to Eastlake, and Eastlake from I-10 to its intersection with Darrington. When it was finished, ownership and responsibility for maintenance were conveyed to El Paso County.

The second part of the Eastlake project was constructed by Horizon Communities. It involved construction and paving from the Darrington intersection to Horizon Boulevard. Upon completion, the Town of Horizon City took over title and maintenance from Horizon Communities. The immediate benefit of the $1.96 million project was the diversion of traffic away from Darrington Street and its school zones. It also opened up the land in this area for new development. Houses have sprung up rapidly in new subdivisions lining these frontages.

Horizon Communities has made other contributions to improvements to the local road network in the past. Repairs and maintenance for the incorporated area are now the responsibility of the Town of Horizon City. Outside Horizon boundaries, the county is responsible for local roads.
In recent years, excellent progress has been made in bringing medical, dental and pharmaceutical services to the Horizon area. Two pediatric clinics have been established, this at a time when El Paso continues to struggle with attracting physicians, particularly pediatricians.

The Horizon Physicians clinic is a private practice operated by Dr. Rodin Mendoza-Castillo. Initially, the clinic operated from two locations, but accommodation problems have limited a local presence. Horizon Communties is working with Dr. Mendoza to help him build a permanent clinic in the center of Horizon. In the meantime, Dr. Mendoza is operating from rented premises in East El Paso.

The Child Wellness Center, operating out of the Region 19 Head Start center on Darrington Road, is an initiative of Texas Tech University Health Science Center. The resident pediatrician is Dr. Alison Days. She was joined by a second pediatrician in 2003.

The area is also served by Clinic Guadalupe, a general practice presently based in neighboring Agua Dulce, Texas.

Regional Hospitals and Medical Centers

Thank You
Horizon Communities acknowledges the public and private assistance provided to our clinics. In particular, we thank local builder, Carefree Homes, local developer, Colony Partners East, Texas Tech and the Texas Office of Rural Community Affairs (ORCA) for their most valuable contributions. Horizon Communities is particularly grateful to Carefree Homes for making its generous contribution to our medical establishment fund in 2002.

Horizon Communities continues to pursue high standard medical services for the area.

Looking for a home in the Horizon Area? Let us put you in touch with local area builders, developers and realtors.

We can provide you with list of established entities in our community, some of which have worked closely with Horizon Communities in the past.

A special thank you goes to Carefree Homes and Colony Partners East who contributed to our medical establishment fund. Carefree Homes is building in most Horizon subdivisions. Colony Partners is developing land in Horizon Mesa and Paseo Del Este.

If you are looking for a new home site, you may also contact some of our local area developers directly. They can also put you in touch with other builders.
  • Colony Partners East  – 915.533.7900
  • B&G Land Management  – 915.852.0200
  • The Land Brokers  – 915.852.4900
  • Lower Valley Housing Corporation  – 915.764.3413
Greater El Paso
Whether you live, work, or play in the Horizon area, you'll be close to our big city neighbor, El Paso, Texas.

Just minutes away on I-10, El Paso is a major urban center and multicultural metroplex with a 400-year history, rich tradition, and trademark hospitality. As the largest U.S. city along the U.S. and Mexico border, El Paso offers walking tours of downtown, shopping, outdoor, museums, a zoo, nature trails through four Texas State Parks, an aerial tram up the Franklin Mountains, and more.

Cultural Highlights
The Horizon City/El Paso area is the home of Tom Lea, Leon Metz, and many other artists and writers of regional and national fame. Our museums include:

The El Paso Zoo was voted “Best Field Trip” in 2007 by readers of El Paso Magazine. It also earned “Best Place To Go for $5 or Under” by What’s Up, El Paso’s weekly entertainment magazine. Additionally, the El Paso Zoo does important scientific and conservation work.

Music is part of life in Horizon City. Among the year's traditional highlights are El Paso's Chamber Music Festival, the International Mariachi Festival, the Border Folk Festival, and the International Festival De La Zarzuela. Music lovers can also enjoy performances by:

Dance is very popular entertainment on the border, and Ballet El Paso, Ballet Folklorico, and many other dance groups perform regularly.

Theater enthusiasts have plenty of options. From the Abraham Chavez Theatre to UTEP to community theaters, El Paso offers a full range of theatrical entertainment at a variety of venues.

McKelligon Canyon, El Paso's natural amphitheater, hosts an annual summer Shakespeare festival. Each year, one of the nation's largest outdoor theater presentations is “Viva! El Paso,” an entertainment extravaganza combining song and dance.

Ciudad Juárez, our NAFTA partner to the south, and the state of New Mexico also extend their hospitality.

In addition to golf or tennis at Emerald Springs, sporting activities within short driving distance from Horizon include the Socorro ISD Aquatics Center, hiking, and horseback riding. You can also enjoy:

Football Basketball
Baseball
Horse Racing & Gaming
Soccer
El Paso also has numerous city parks, offering playgrounds, soccer and baseball fields, swimming pools, and more.
The Horizon Communities/El Paso area is located across the Rio Grande from its sister city, Juarez, Mexico. Together, our two cities form a dynamic, powerful economic focal point for domestic and international commerce, with air and rail transportation to virtually anywhere, domestically and internationally.

Air Transportation
Horizon City is only 25 minutes from El Paso International Airport via I-10. Six major airlines serve the airport. Approximately 170 nonstop and direct flights arrive and depart daily from El Paso. Each year more than 3.2 million passengers pass through the El Paso International Airport. Commercial domestic passenger services are provided by American, Delta, Southwest, Frontier, Continental, and America West.

International carriers include:  AeroMexico, Taesa, Aero California, Aero Litoral, Lonestar, and Mexicana to points in Mexico from Juarez Airport. Aero Litoral and Lonestar have flights from El Paso to Chihuahua.

From El Paso passengers may fly direct to:  Albuquerque, Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Chihuahua, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Lubbock, Midland/Odessa, Phoenix, San Antonio. From Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, and Houston passengers are only one flight away from destinations in Europe.

Airfreight carriers serving El Paso International Airport include:  Aero-Freight, American, Emery, Southwest, Aero-Flash, Burlington Air, Federal Express, Team Air Express, Air Express International, Korean Air, UPS Air Transportation Inc., Charter Air, MAF World Wide Express, Airborne Express, KHL, Rasmark, America West, and Delta.

Federal Express operates from its newly expanded facility, which was completed December 2000. The facility is located on Boeing and Hawkins behind the airport tower, next to the main Post Office.

As a major center for domestic and international trade, El Paso has experienced tremendous growth in volume of air cargo. The 95,000 tons that passed through our airport in 1999 are projected to increase to 220,000 tons by 2007. Companies that do business in El Paso can expect a level of airfreight service that is second to none.

Rail Transportation
Amtrak provides passenger rail transportation to and from the El Paso area. Rail freight to and from the El Paso region is provided by these mainline railroads: Union Pacific, Burlington Northern Santa Fe, and Ferro Mex.


    OUR GOOD LIFE

The Advantages

Our core communities offer all the advantages of small-town living, friendliness, safety, good schools, local shops, and peace and quiet. Horizon’s residents know each other and watch out for one another. Neighbors can meet up at the country club, which offers an 18-hole golf course, tennis courts, swimming pool, elegant dining, and entertainment. Old-fashioned community values are alive and well here.
 
 
 
  Big City Amenities

The city of El Paso is less than a 15 minute drive west of Horizon. Some of El Paso’s newest shopping malls, outlets, and restaurants are located on El Paso’s rapidly growing eastside. For a more exotic shopping experience, cross the Zaragoza International Bridge and enjoy what Mexico has to offer. We are also 10 minutes from Mission Valley, once settled by the Spanish in the late 16th century. The old churches that line the historic Mission Trail mark the birthplace of El Paso. And with such close access to I-10, road trips spanning the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean is easy.
 
 
 
  The Climate

Here in the high desert, our average high summer temperature is 95 degrees. The average winter high is about 60 degrees. Low humidity and moderate rainfall, 8.65 inches annually, combine to create an ideal climate.

In winter, sunshine and warmth are aplenty. Concerned you might miss the snow? Don't worry. Some winters deliver up to six inches of snowfall overnight (the all time record for El Paso was 22.4 inches in 1987). But wake up early to build your snowman. It will probably melt by noon.
 
     
 
         
           
  Horizon Communities Improvement Association
14200 Ashford • Horizon City, TX 79928
915.852.1811 • FAX 915.852.1814 • 1.800.729.4242
   
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